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The Model 1911 .45

"Old World Quality and Craftsmanship©"
BSR Custom Arms - A Division of
BSR GROUP, INC.

    (NOTE: While this section is devoted to competition quality builds-ups of the 1911 .45, we offer the same quality modifications to revolvers and to other semi-automatic handguns such as the Browning Hi-Power, Sig Arms and Glock.)

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BSR Custom Competition Model 1911 .45 Build-ups  
Before You Leave This Page!

So, You Want to Build a Custom Competition Quality 1911 .45!  
All about the Model 1911 .45 Pistol - How does it Work - How Does is Work Better?

Accuracy
Trigger Mechanism
Install a Compensator

Fit Matched Barrel
Fit Ramped Barrel
Install Cone Bushing
Install Beavertail grip safety
Install Match Trigger
Install Flared Magazine Well
Tighten Slide and Rails
Cut Ejection Port
Square Trigger Guard
Action Job

(Click on any of the above to jump to that section.)


Before deciding what you want, it is important to fully understand the workings of the 1911 style pistol, its limitations, problems, and methods of correction.  Only by understanding the .45 can you properly select the custom features that will provide maximum benefit, reliability, and shot-to-shot consistency.

The 1911-style pistol is a combat sidearm designed to function under a variety of conditions and fired at point blank range.  It serves its intended purpose very well.  In order to accomplish this purpose, the gun is made within wide tolerances, enough to prevent interference by dirt, sand, mud, or any other situation that might cause malfunction.  Problems are encountered when the gun is asked to perform beyond its intended purpose.  In essence, the 1911-style pistol was not intended to be accurate or feed any ammo type other than full metal-jacketed round nose.  If this is your intention, then major changes will need to be performed.  Although we routinely refer to these changes as correcting problems, this is not the case - we are asking the 1911 pistol to perform beyond its intended purpose.

Accuracy:
Accuracy in any firearm is dependent on consistent barrel positioning and round chambering.  The more parts involved in this operation the more inconsistent lock-up will be.  The more movable parts, the more wear points exist.  For this reason, bolt actions are the most reliable and accurate, having a minimum of movable parts involved in chambering and lock-up.  On the 1911-style pistol, the bottom barrel lug, front and rear top barrel lugs, barrel hood, bushing-barrel fit, bushing-slide fit, and slide-frame fit are all involved in lock-up and barrel placement.  There is, therefore, a minimum of seven wear points.  Assuming maximum tolerances of 0.001" at each variable point, theoretical lock-up variability cannot be less than 0.007".  However, by hand fitting each part in a sequential pattern and eliminating some wear points, consistency in lock-up beyond the theoretical limits can be achieved.

The bottom and top locking lugs on all factory barrels are undercut.  This means that full lock-up can never be achieved.  Specifically, the bottom lug will not allow full engagement of the top locking lugs.  Maximum accuracy of the 1911-style pistol is achieved when the top locking lugs have 100% engagement of the rear lug and 85% of the front lug and such engagement is accomplished solely by the bottom lug.  To achieve this engagement, a match grade barrel with oversized lugs must be used.  These oversized lugs are then hand-fitted to achieve the precise lug engagement for maximum accuracy and shot-to-shot consistency.  The barrel hood, which functions to limit horizontal barrel movement, must also be hand fitted from an oversized hood.

The front barrel bushing, which holds and supports the front of the free-floating barrel, has two wear points: the barrel-bushing and slide-bushing fit.  Factory bushings are all undersized to provide ease in removal and function with all factory barrels and their variable tolerances.  If the bushing can be moved by hand, it is undersized and will result in inconsistent barrel placement during lock-up.  An oversized bushing should be hand fitted and lapped to less than 0.001" clearances between the slide and barrel.  An alternative, and far better solution, is to completely remove the entire bushing system.  In lieu of the factory style bushing, a cone shaped bushing is installed permanently on the barrel that acts like a wedge and insures consistent lock-up.  The barrel-bushing wear point and variable is completely eliminated.  Additionally, the cone bushing ensures a greater contact area between the bushing and slide also improving consistency.  The end result is a consistent front barrel lock-up of less than 0.001" clearance.  At lock-up, under the force of the recoil spring, a wedge (cone bushing) is forced between the barrel and slide.  This bushing system will undoubtedly become the gold standard in the future.

Lastly, is the variability of the slide-frame position at lock-up.  The .45 slide rides on the frame rails during cycling and any wobble in this fit will result in inconsistent slide positioning during lock-up.  The lateral and horizontal movement of the slide, common to all factory .45’s, is often heard as a rattle. To limit lateral movement, the frame rails are compressed to achieve less than 0.001" clearances between the slide and frame while still maintaining smooth cycling.  Horizontal movement, also at less than 0.001", is achieved by compressing the sides of the slide.

Since all these variables described above function together to achieve a single goal, lock-up, and each part is dependent on the function of the other, all variables need to be dealt with together and in a specific sequence.  In other words, for example, you are defeating your purpose to fit a new barrel without correcting the other variables.  Additionally, it is possible that the new barrel may not fit properly if the other variables are corrected later on.  Again, the entire barrel lock-up system needs to be addressed simultaneously, not independently, and in a specific sequence.  Proper fitting must be performed in the following sequence: 1) fit slide-frame to less than 0.001"; 2) fit barrel bushing; 3) fit top locking lugs; 4) fit bottom locking lug; and 5) fit barrel link (functions in unlocking).

Trigger mechanism:
Perhaps more important that the accuracy of the pistol itself is the ability of the shooter to deliver the accuracy potential of the pistol.  This is in large part a function of the trigger mechanism - the human element (shooter) and the mechanical element (pistol) are joined together through the trigger mechanism.  Even the best shooter cannot shoot well without a fine tuned trigger mechanism.  Such must be smooth, consistent, and crisp.  A wide variety of parts function within the trigger mechanism and, as with barrel lock-up, all must function together in harmony and complement each other.  The critical functional parts of the 1911-style trigger mechanism include the trigger, the trigger bow, the sear, the hammer, the firing pin and spring, the mainspring, the sear spring, and the recoil spring.  Among these movable parts are the disconnector, grip safety, and thumb safety.  Lets take a look at how these parts function in a simplistic fashion.

At lock-up, the sear is engaged in the hammer notch under pressure of the sear spring and the hammer is forced against the sear by the mainspring.  The bow of the free-floating trigger, indirectly through the disconnector, touches the bottom of the sear.  As the trigger is pulled, the bow pushes the disconnector, which in turn pushes the sear, (against the forces of the sear spring, mainspring, and surface-surface contact between the sear and hammer) until the sear and hammer disconnect.  We can see that the weight of the trigger pull and its smoothness are dependent on 1) insurance that the trigger is free-floating (no frame contact); 2) that the trigger bow rides smoothly over its rails on the frame; 3) the pressure imposed on the sear-hammer contact by the sear spring and mainspring; and 4) the smoothness of the surfaces of the hammer and sear on which the sear travels.  Additionally, all parts must be free-floating except for their intended contact areas.  As the hammer falls, the amount of power delivered to the firing pin is dependent on the mainspring and the weight and physical shape (leverage) of the hammer.  The hammer that in turn, against the pressure of the firing pin spring, strikes the primer strikes the firing pin.  A change in any of these variables, such as the mainspring, sear spring, weight and shape of the hammer, firing spring, and the weight of the firing pin, will all determine how hard the primer is hit.  Changing the mainspring to reduce trigger pull, for example, can result in poor primer ignition (or misfires) unless the loss in power is compensated through other parts.  As the round fires, the recoil (gas pressure) forces the slide toward the rear, the barrel link disconnects the upper locking lugs, and the slide travels until the bottom lug contacts the frame.  The recoil spring will largely determine how hard the barrel lug will hit the frame.  As a result, heavy loads shot with a light recoil spring can cause the frame and/or barrel lug to crack.  The movement of the slide disconnects the disconnector and allows the sear to return to its original position and the hammer is cocked as it is forced back by the slide.  The slide uses the recoil spring to return to battery and lock-up with noticeable force and forward directed shock.  As the slide moves forward, the bottom-locking lug raises the barrel at the precise moment to force the top locking lugs into engagement.  The mass and weight of the internal parts, by inertia, resist this forward movement of the gun around them.  Forward travel of the slide, synchronized with locking of the top and bottom lugs and barrel bushing, is stopped by the bottom lug as full engagement of the top lugs is achieved.

The disconnector, which is the middleman between trigger and sear, is engaged only when the slide is in its full forward locked position, thereby preventing firing (trigger-sear contact) unless the gun is in full lock-up.  The thumb safety, when engaged, fits within a notch in the hammer preventing forward movement of the hammer.  The grip safety is positioned behind the trigger bow preventing rearward travel (sear contact) unless moved out of the way by grip pressure.  In Series 80 pistols, a firing pin block is incorporated into the slide to prevent forward movement of the firing pin when the slide is not in full lock-up (it complements the disconnector).

To insure the greatest union between the shooter and the gun, the entire trigger mechanism must be smooth and precisely tuned (including all safeties) to within 0.001" tolerances and lock-time (the time between pulling the trigger and the gun firing) must be minimal.  This is accomplished by selecting only the highest quality parts and hand fitting each component to exact tolerances.  Physical shapes of each part, spring forces, and riding (contact) surfaces must all be complementary to each other to achieve proper operation and obtain that "custom" trigger pull.

Additional Features:
Once the accuracy and shooter-gun contact is established, the rest of the custom features of the pistol are intended to bring balance and holding consistency to the gun.  They are often considered "frills".  However, do not underestimate the importance of frills because they will determine the overall handle-ability and balance of the pistol.  Such features as beavertail grip safeties, wide extended slide release, flared wells, grips, sights, etc. will greatly affect the comfort of the gun in your hand, your ability to consistently hold and maneuver that gun, and your overall ability to deliver a bullet to its intended target.  While these feature greatly affect the cosmetic appearance of a gun that is not their sole purpose.  See individual parts in the pages that follow for a description of what each "frill" is intended to accomplish.

Install Compensator:
BSR Group recommends only compensators that are permanently attached to the barrel, not those that replace the barrel bushing. A Dual Port compensator should be the least amount of porting available on the compensator.  Dual, rounded chamber designs direct exiting barrel gases upward for maximum downward pressure to keep muzzle rise and recoil to an absolute minimum for better shooter control.  The compensator should have an attached front sight, be CNC machined from a solid piece of steel to very close tolerances for flawless functioning.  Installation involves threading the outside of a pre-fitted match barrel, milling the front slide 3 deg., and attaching the compensator at the appropriate distance on the barrel.  The compensator is then sealed to the barrel.

Fit Matched Barrel:
For improved accuracy, reliability, and consistent shot-to-shot placement, all match pistols should have match barrels installed.  Match barrels are supplied with oversized top and bottom lugs for precise fitting and come in a length of 6 inches providing a greater versatility in use.  The barrel is available in Chrome Moly steel only.  The top and bottom lugs are hand fitted to within 0.001" tolerances, ensuring complete lock-up on the bottom lug.  The top lugs are hand fitted to insure a precise 100% lock-up of the rear lug and 85% of the front.

Fit Ramped Barrel:
One of the major problems encountered in the performance of the .45 automatic is the gap that exists between the barrel and frame.  The requirement of a cartridge to jump this gap often results in jamming, particularly with bullet heads other than round nose.  Throating and polishing the barrel/frame helps correct this situation, but does not completely eliminate chances of a jam, and throating often leads to head separations and bulged cases.

Installation of a barrel with an extended integral ramp which fully supports the case head essentially eliminates jamming as rounds feed directly onto the barrels integral feed ramp; no barrel-to-frame gap to jump or hang up on.  A fully supported case head prevents bulged cases and head separations.

The barrel is supplied with oversized top and bottom lugs for precise fitting and comes only in a length of 6 inches providing a greater versatility in use.  The barrel is available in Chrome Moly steel only.  The top and bottom lugs are hand fitted to within 0.001" tolerances, ensuring complete lock-up on the bottom lug.  The top lugs are hand fitted to insure a precise 100% lock-up of the rear lug and 85% of the front.

Install Cone Bushing:
The front barrel bushing, which holds and supports the front of the free-floating barrel, has two wear points: the barrel-bushing and slide-bushing fit.  Factory bushings are all undersized to provide ease in removal and function with all factory barrels and their variable tolerances.  If the bushing can be moved by hand, it is undersized and will result in inconsistent barrel placement during lock-up.  An oversized bushing should be hand fitted and lapped to less than 0.001" clearances between the slide and barrel.  An alternative, and far better solution, is to completely remove the entire bushing system.  In lieu of the factory style bushing, a cone shaped bushing is installed permanently on the barrel that acts like a wedge and insures consistent lock-up.  The barrel-bushing wear point and variable is completely eliminated.  Additionally, the cone bushing ensures a greater contact area between the bushing and slide also improving consistency.  The end result is a consistent front barrel lock-up of less than 0.001" clearance.  At lock-up, under the force of the recoil spring, a wedge (cone bushing) is forced between the barrel and slide.  This bushing system will undoubtedly become the gold standard in the future.

Install Beavertail grip safety:
Beavertail Grip Safeties stop .45-hammer bite but don’t make the shooter with large hands give up precious grip room.  Tails are notched for the hammer and sweep up.  The gun sinks deeper in the hand for straighter line from slide to wrist.  This requires permanent frame alterations and spot re-bluing.

Install Match Trigger:
The trigger itself is the most movable part of the trigger mechanism and plays an integral part of the entire mechanism.  It is therefore beneficial that the trigger be as light as possible (decreased resistance) and smooth in its travel.  Match triggers are long and lightweight triggers for light trigger pull and fast return.  The bow is swaged to the trigger and over travel, adjustment is available.  The triggers are provided oversized for precise hand fitting.  Triggers of "space-age" material are also available.

Install Flared Magazine Well:
We recommend only flared magazine wells that become an integral part of the frame, not the clip on type.  These magazine flares replace the bottom 1/4 inch of the frame (which is milled off) and silver soldered in place.  As a result, the contours can be perfectly blended with the frame and, unlike other after market wells; it is solidly welded to the frame and cannot wobble.  As part of the fitting, the mainspring housing is beveled to match the well contours thereby providing a flare at the back of the frame.  Since the well replaces part of the frame, rather than attaching to it, extended magazines or bumpers are not required.  Requires permanent alterations to frame and re-bluing may be required.

Tighten Slide and Rails:
To insure consistent lock-up of the slide (barrel) and frame, all looseness between the rails of the frame and slide must be minimized.  Any slide wobble will affect overall lock-up and accuracy.  Although it cannot be completely removed, it can be brought to very close tolerances.  The frame rails are compressed to remove lateral movement and the slide compressed to remove horizontal movement.  The slide-frame is then hand lapped with carbide grits, ending in 800 grit, to remove all drag while maintaining lateral and horizontal movement during lock-up at less than 0.001".  Although some "quick and dirty" methods are available, they cannot compare to carefully hand fitting and lapping.

Cut Ejection Port:
The 1911-style pistol is well known for throwing cases in every direction.  This is due largely to the cases hitting the moving slide during ejection.  To produce consistent ejection, and literally have cases drop at your feet, the ejection port is widened to within 0.500" of the bottom of the slide.  This feature, combined with an extended ejector, insures that the empty case will clear the ejection port during ejection resulting in improved ejection and reasonably consistent case placement.  This also requires permanent slide alterations and spot re-bluing.

Square Trigger Guard:
Many shooters like to rest their support hand (usually the left) around the trigger guard to aid in stability.  Round trigger guards can be uncomfortable and prone to slippage.  To aid in the double handgrip, the trigger guard is heated and then forged to a right angle thereby creating a squared trigger guard.  Permanent frame alteration and re-bluing required.

Action Job:
A trigger mechanism is a complex and subtle system involving a large number of parts that need to fit and work in complete harmony.  In the 1911-style pistol, for example, the trigger mechanism involves the trigger, sear, disconnector, hammer, strut, leaf spring, main spring, grip safety, thumb safety, pins, frame, slide, slide closing shock, normal wear, magazine catch, and magazine insertion.  Each of these components and factors must work in harmony at the same time in the same gun to produce the perfect trigger job.  If any of these components are inferior, a perfect trigger job cannot be safely achieved and the overall mechanism will be inferior.

A smooth crisp trigger pull is dependent upon precise and smooth fitting of specially selected internal parts and springs to very close tolerances (less than 0.001") between all movable and contact surfaces.  With top quality parts and springs that complement each other and precise hand fitting, a smooth crisp trigger pull of about 2.5 pounds is achieved.  There is absolutely no comparison or method to describe the feel and union created between the shooter and the pistol by a custom hand fitted trigger mechanism.

Install Low Profile Sights:
Low-Profile Millet Combat Sights. Due to the shallow dovetail on the 1911, fully adjustable sights tend to ride high above the top of the slide and require a large front blade.  This results in a higher plane of sight that often results in a slower or sluggish shot recovery, i.e., time required to relocate sights in relation to the gun.  To alleviate this situation, a new dovetail and sight base are cut deep into the slide to allow for an adjustable sight that is not significantly higher than the original factory blade.

Trigger Guard/Ft Strap Checkering:

Add the distinctive feature of hand checkering to the front strap, trigger guard, and other areas in which a non-slip surface is desirable.  Available in 20 or 30 lines per inch, and 60˚ or 90˚  diamonds. Requires re-bluing.

 

BSR Custom Competition Quality Model 1911 .45 Build-ups  

Features:
1.
Match grade ramped barrel
2. Dual Port Compensator
3. Flared Magazine Well
4. Hammer-sear Combination
5. Match Trigger
6. Low-Profile Millet Combat Sights
7. Links (Kings or Marvel)
8. Long Guide Rod (Clark)
9. Ambidextrous safety, stainless steel (Ed Brown)
10. Beavertail Grip Safety, stainless steel (Ed Brown)
11. Slide Release, stainless steel (Kings)
12. Checkered front strap and trigger guard
13. Mainspring Housing, stainless steel
14. Exotic Wood Grip Panels (Ahrends)
15. Allen head Grip Screws, stainless steel (Ed Brown)
16. Competition Quality Springs (Wolff)
17. Magazine button, stainless steel
18. Extractor, improved
19. Ejector, improved
20. Action job
21. Tighten Slide and Rails
22. Cut Ejection Port
23. Square Trigger Guard
24. Re-blue, Master grade, dual finish
25. Options
                                                  Titanium trigger components
                              Nickel Plating 
(Click on any of the above to jump to that section.)   

BSR Group recommends the following in assembling a 1911 .45 competition quality pistol.  These features were specially selected to complement each other and provide a well balanced, easily handled, accurate, consistent, and reliable competition pistol.  Certain features may not suit your particular needs and other features not considered may be desired.  These can all be accomplished, however, we reserve the right to refuse installation of particular items if deemed to interfere or fail to complement critical elements of the pistol.

1. Match grade ramped barrel.  One of the major problems encountered in the performance of the .45 automatic is the gap that exists between the barrel and frame.  The requirement of a cartridge to jump this gap often results in jamming, particularly with bullet heads other than round nose.  Throating and polishing the barrel/frame helps correct this situation, but does not completely eliminate chances of a jam, and throating often leads to head separations and bulged cases.

Installation of a barrel with an extended integral ramp which fully supports the case head essentially eliminates jamming as rounds feed directly onto the barrels integral feed ramp; no barrel-to-frame gap to jump or hang up on.  A fully supported case head prevents bulged cases and head separations.

The barrel is supplied with oversized top and bottom lugs for precise fitting and comes only in a length of 6 inches providing a greater versatility in use.  The barrel is available in Chrome Moly steel only.  The top and bottom lugs are hand fitted to within 0.001" tolerances, ensuring complete lock-up on the bottom lug.  The top lugs are hand fitted to insure a precise 100% lock-up of the rear lug and 85% of the front.  Requires permanent alterations to frame.

2. Dual Port Compensator.  Dual, rounded chamber design directs exiting barrel gases upward for maximum downward pressure to keep muzzle rise and recoil to an absolute minimum for better shooter control.  The compensator, with post front sight, is CNC machined from a solid piece of steel to very close tolerances for flawless functioning.  The Silhouette Arms compensator is currently considered the best compensator on the market today.

One of the problems with 1911 .45 accuracy is related to the front bushing which supports the barrel over a very narrow area.  Any play in the barrel-bushing-slide results in a wobbly barrel and inconsistent lock-up.  The Silhouette Arms compensator eliminates the front barrel bushing of the .45 and replaces it with a cone shaped lock-up system. The cone bushing increases the slide and barrel lock-up area for better accuracy and greater shot-to-shot consistency.  Replacement of the barrel bushing also eliminates one wear point.  Requires permanent alterations to slide and barrel.

3. Flared Magazine Well.  The Ed Brown Maxi-Well is the most durable and best looking of all flared wells because it literally becomes part of the gun.  It replaces the bottom 1/4 inch of the frame (which is milled off) and is silver soldered in place.  As a result, the contours can be perfectly blended with the frame and, unlike other after market wells, it is solidly welded to the frame and cannot wobble. As part of the fitting, the mainspring housing is beveled to match the well contours thereby providing a flare at the back of the frame.  As the well replaces part of the frame, rather than attaching to it, extended magazines or bumpers are not required.  Requires permanent alterations to frame and re-bluing may be required depending on fit desired.

4. Hammer-sear Combination.  Competition quality hammers and sears are computer designed and machined for consistently close tolerances and smoothest, cleanest, trigger pull possible.  All angles are precisely cut, contact points correctly shaped, plus Gold Cup style lowered strut hole.  They are narrowed for greater slide clearance and incorporate an exclusive "V" half-cock notch that will not damage the sear.  The hammer and sear come with a lifetime warranty and can be machined and re-polished by the manufacturer for only a $4.00 handling fee.

5. Match Trigger.  The trigger itself is the most movable part of the trigger mechanism and plays an integral part of the entire mechanism.  It is therefore beneficial that the trigger be as light as possible (decreased resistance) and smooth in its travel.  Match triggers are long and light weight for light trigger pull, fast return.  The bow is swaged to the trigger and over-travel adjustment is available.  The trigger is provided oversized for precise hand fitting.  Triggers of "space-age" material are also available.

6. Low-Profile Millet Combat Sights.  Due to the shallow dovetail on the 1911, fully adjustable sights tend to ride high above the top of the slide and require a large front blade.  This results in a higher plane of sight that often results in a slower or sluggish shot recovery, i.e., time required to relocate sights in relation to the gun.  To alleviate this situation, a new dovetail and sight base are cut deep into the slide to allow for an adjustable sight that is not significantly higher than the original factory blade.  Permanent alterations to slide required.

7. Links (Kings or Marvel).  Too short a link can keep the barrel from unlocking and returning to battery properly.  The link is fitted to within 0.003" to insure proper unlocking of the top lugs (the links function is unlocking and not lock-up as many attempt to use them).

8. Long Guide Rod (Clark).  A full-length recoil spring guide stops the recoil spring from kinking and binding.  You get smoother, more consistent and reliable cycling.  Chambering and extraction are also improved.

9. Ambidextrous safety, stainless steel (Ed Brown).  Big, wide, and an extended thumb surface slopes down and away from the gun; made to work with the natural sweeping motion used to release the safety.  Ambidextrous model makes gun efficient for right or left-handers and is great in weak hand matches.

10. Beavertail Grip Safety, stainless steel (Ed Brown).  Stops .45 hammer bite but doesn’t make the shooter with large hands give up precious grip room.  Tail is notched for the hammer and sweeps up farther than others.  The gun sinks deeper in the hand for straighter line from slide to wrist.  Requires permanent frame alterations.

11. Slide Release, stainless steel (Kings).  Unique design of Kings Extended Slide Stop Release allows the shooter to release the slide without changing hand position.  Deeply grooved, non-slip surface.  Made oversized for precise hand fitting.

12. Checkered front strap and trigger guard.  Adds a secure, slip-proof grip to the front strap.

13. Mainspring Housing, stainless steel.  Solid steel mainspring housing with deep checkering to keep the 1911 firmly located in the shooters hand.  Available arched or flat.  Permanent modifications required if flared well installed.

14. Exotic Wood Grip Panels (Ahrends).  Beautiful, distinctive, exotic wood grip panels precision shaped, hand checkered, oil finished, and carefully paired.  Traditional, but not old fashion!  Available in the following exotic wood: bubinga, cocobolo, cordia, gaboon ebony, kingwood, moradillo, rosewood, tulipwood, and traditional walnut.

15. Allen head Grip Screws, stainless steel (Ed Brown).  Beautifully machined with the correctly proportioned head and hole size, contoured to fit any grip and look great.  No more buggered screw heads.

16. Competition Quality Springs (Wolff).  Specially selected replacement springs to improve functioning and reduce trigger pull greatly complement a top quality-tuning job.  Springs are designed and made by the foremost spring maker in the firearms industry (Wolff) to give you the smoothness, long-term reliability and consistency of response time that you want.  The following springs are replaced: recoil spring, firing pin spring, magazine catch spring, firing pin safety block spring (series 80), plunger tube springs, and sear spring.  Installation included in action job.

17. Magazine button, stainless steel.  An oversized stainless steel magazine button to complement the overall contrast between blued steel and stainless steel.

18. Extractor, improved.  Extra deep hooks grab cases firmly, pulls even the hottest reloads out for positive ejection.  Thicker than standard shanks prevent breakage.  Inexpensive insurance for any 1911.

19. Ejector, improved.  Positively kicks cases out to prevent jams caused by inconsistent ejection.  Actually kicks cases out before slide is fully open thereby ejecting the case before the new round begins its travel into the chamber.

20. Action job.  A smooth crisp trigger pull is dependent upon precise and smooth fitting of specially selected internal parts and springs to very close tolerances (less than 0.001") between all movable and contact surfaces.  With top quality parts and springs that complement each other and precise hand fitting, a smooth crisp trigger pull of about 2.5 pounds is achieved.  There is absolutely no comparison or method to describe the feel and union created between the shooter and the pistol by a custom hand fitted trigger mechanism.

21. Tighten Slide and Rails.  To insure consistent lock-up of the slide (barrel) and frame, all looseness between the rails of the frame and slide must be minimized.  Any slide wobble will affect overall lock-up and accuracy.  Although it cannot be completely removed, it can be brought to very close tolerances.  The frame rails are compressed to remove lateral movement and the slide compressed to remove horizontal movement.  The slide-frame is then hand lapped with carbide grits, ending in 800 grit, to remove all drag while maintaining lateral and horizontal movement during lock-up at less than 0.001".  Although some "quick and dirty" methods are available, they cannot compare to carefully hand fitting and lapping.

22. Cut Ejection Port.  The 1911-style pistol is well known for throwing cases in every direction; due largely to the cases hitting the moving slide during ejection.  To produce consistent ejection, and literally have cases drop at your feet, the ejection port is widened to within 0.500" of the bottom of the slide.  This feature, combined with an extended ejector, insures that the empty case will clear the ejection port during ejection resulting in improved ejection and reasonably consistent case placement.  Requires permanent slide alterations.

23. Square Trigger Guard.  Many shooters like to rest their support hand (usually the left) around the trigger guard to aid in stability.  Round trigger guards can be uncomfortable and prone to slippage.  To aid in the double handgrip, the trigger guard is heated and then forged to a right angle thereby creating a squared trigger guard.  Permanent frame alteration and re-bluing required.  

24. Re-blue, Master grade, dual finish.  All external parts are manually polished to remove all mill marks and scratches to create a mirror finish.  The gun is polished with 140 and 240 grit on soft felt wheels, which is then followed by 400 grit on both a soft felt and loose muslin wheel.  A mirror finish is created by polishing with 500 grit on both medium hard felt and loose muslin wheels and then with 3 grades of 555 stainless polish on both hard felt and loose muslin wheels.  This process involves 7 different steel polishes and 12 different polishing wheels.  The gun is then carefully taped and specific surfaces sand blasted to create a non-glare matt finish.  All steel parts are chemically cleaned, blued in caustic salts at 292˚F for 30 minutes, boiled in water for 45 minutes, and then cooled under oil.  The end result is a high luster blue with a matted top surface.  Stainless steel parts are only cleaned, boiled, and soaked in oil after polishing.

25. Options.

Titanium trigger components.  Titanium parts weigh approximately 45% less than their steel counterparts.  The lighter weight of a titanium hammer, strut, and firing pin mean the mainspring can accelerate these parts faster for quicker ignition after triggering.  The use of titanium parts is said to reduce lock-time (the time between pulling the trigger and the gun going bang) by 45%.  During lock-time, the shooter generally moves the gun and by reducing lock-time, shot placement may more closely match the sight picture when the gun was triggered.

Nickel Plating.  To add rust resistant properties to the gun or improve contrast between parts, the gun can be nickel plated in either a high luster or matte finish or both.  Cost depends on finish desired.

 

COMPLETE PACKAGE DEAL*: $2,850.00
*Not including cost of pistol, or, options.  50% deposit required.
Cost subject to change without notice  

LET US BUILD ONE FOR YOU! 

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